Lying for Acceptance
 Sometimes people feel uncomfortable about the way they are, and are afraid of how others will react to the truth about them. So, we choose to lie in order to be accepted by others (This is one of many reasons why people lie). An example of lying for acceptance would be telling your friends that you love Harry Potter after they took you to Movie Number Seven for a birthday surprise. Even if you hate the Harry Potter series, in order to be accepted you might lie and pretend that you like the books.
Comic:
In this comic, Wendy the tree lies about her age, but it is revealed to the other trees after she falls down and they count her rings. Wendy lied in order to be accepted by the other trees, she wanted to fit in, maybe be seen differently or more attractively. 

Lying for Acceptance

 Sometimes people feel uncomfortable about the way they are, and are afraid of how others will react to the truth about them. So, we choose to lie in order to be accepted by others (This is one of many reasons why people lie). An example of lying for acceptance would be telling your friends that you love Harry Potter after they took you to Movie Number Seven for a birthday surprise. Even if you hate the Harry Potter series, in order to be accepted you might lie and pretend that you like the books.

Comic:

In this comic, Wendy the tree lies about her age, but it is revealed to the other trees after she falls down and they count her rings. Wendy lied in order to be accepted by the other trees, she wanted to fit in, maybe be seen differently or more attractively. 

Sexism and Nature VS Nurture:
Sexism is the idea that one gender is better or superior to the other.  Often, sexism is related back to the Nature VS Nurture Debate because we often wonder why certain beliefs are held about each gender.  Example: Are males seen as more athletic in general because they were born more strong and competitive, or is that something that we have been nurtured to know, something that has been implanted in our brains by our culture?
Comic:
This picture depicts a man rejecting a woman from a job, saying that she wasn’t “the right man for the job”. This shows that he probably has sexist beliefs, perhaps she didn’t get the job because she is a woman.  Going back to Nature VS Nurture, is this woman unable to do the job naturally, or is that something we have been nurtured to learn? The debate continues…

Sexism and Nature VS Nurture:

Sexism is the idea that one gender is better or superior to the other.  Often, sexism is related back to the Nature VS Nurture Debate because we often wonder why certain beliefs are held about each gender.  Example: Are males seen as more athletic in general because they were born more strong and competitive, or is that something that we have been nurtured to know, something that has been implanted in our brains by our culture?

Comic:

This picture depicts a man rejecting a woman from a job, saying that she wasn’t “the right man for the job”. This shows that he probably has sexist beliefs, perhaps she didn’t get the job because she is a woman.  Going back to Nature VS Nurture, is this woman unable to do the job naturally, or is that something we have been nurtured to learn? The debate continues…

Nature VS Nurture Cartoon- 
The main question in the Nature VS Nurture debate is, Are we who we are because of our genetics, or because of the way we have been raised?  The truth is, we are affected by both our genes and our experiences-but how much are we shaped by each? The argument can go on forever because on one hand many of our traits are passed down from our biological parents, but on the other hand we are also shaped and changed by our surroundings and what we encounter throughout our life. 
Cartoon: In this cartoon we see a man turning into a werewolf and ripping his shirt off. Next to him on the couch, there is a woman who says “You’re lucky-I’m turning into my mother.” This relates to the Nature VS Nurture debate because of the woman’s dialogue. The older she gets, the more she begins to act and look like her mother.  This could easily show either side of the debate. Perhaps she is acting like her mother because of her DNA, but on the flip side, maybe she is doing so because she was raised by her mother and in response, does similar things.  

Nature VS Nurture Cartoon-

The main question in the Nature VS Nurture debate is, Are we who we are because of our genetics, or because of the way we have been raised?  The truth is, we are affected by both our genes and our experiences-but how much are we shaped by each? The argument can go on forever because on one hand many of our traits are passed down from our biological parents, but on the other hand we are also shaped and changed by our surroundings and what we encounter throughout our life. 

Cartoon: In this cartoon we see a man turning into a werewolf and ripping his shirt off. Next to him on the couch, there is a woman who says “You’re lucky-I’m turning into my mother.” This relates to the Nature VS Nurture debate because of the woman’s dialogue. The older she gets, the more she begins to act and look like her mother.  This could easily show either side of the debate. Perhaps she is acting like her mother because of her DNA, but on the flip side, maybe she is doing so because she was raised by her mother and in response, does similar things.  

Spanking Debate
The debate on whether spanking is detrimental or helpful to children has fired up in recent years as it has become less and less acceptable to punish your children in this way.  In fact, in 2008 a no-spanking bill was passed by senators in Canada. But, is there any good behind this method of punishment? Many claim that when their child is out of control, a little spank on the bum will whip them into shape, and will just shock the child, without really hurting them. Others claim that spanking leads to violent kids, and sends a bad message to children.  What do you think?
Cartoon:
The cartoon above depicts a mother spanking her child while saying “don’t hit your brother again!” This cartoon is clearly anti-spanking, as it shows the irony in the mother’s punishment. She is hitting her son while trying to get him to stop hitting his brother.  

Spanking Debate

The debate on whether spanking is detrimental or helpful to children has fired up in recent years as it has become less and less acceptable to punish your children in this way.  In fact, in 2008 a no-spanking bill was passed by senators in Canada. But, is there any good behind this method of punishment? Many claim that when their child is out of control, a little spank on the bum will whip them into shape, and will just shock the child, without really hurting them. Others claim that spanking leads to violent kids, and sends a bad message to children.  What do you think?

Cartoon:

The cartoon above depicts a mother spanking her child while saying “don’t hit your brother again!” This cartoon is clearly anti-spanking, as it shows the irony in the mother’s punishment. She is hitting her son while trying to get him to stop hitting his brother.  

Body Language:
Every moment, we show our feelings to others by sending out signals and micro-expressions. This is called body language. Although some body language is obvious, like a smile or a wave, real body language is subconscious and difficult for us to control. What makes it so tricky is that the signals we may be sending may be very different than what we want to send.  This is why being able to read other’s body language is so very important.  
Cartoon:
In the image above, we see a man and a woman on the subway. The woman has arrows pointing to her that say “aloof”, an the man has arrows pointing to him saying “friendly”.  If you look at their bodies, what they are doing makes a lot of sense. The woman’s legs are crossed and her arms are across the body, which shows that she is guarded and uncomfortable. But, the man has a smile and an open stance, and his core is directed towards the woman, which means he indeed is feeling friendly and comfortable towards her.  What is funny in this situation is the two very different reactions. I would guess that the man is not picking up on the woman’s signals very accurately, because he doesn’t seem to notice that she is aloof.  Or perhaps the woman doesn’t notice that some of her signals are indeed friendly. Maybe he noticed that her body is angled toward him, or that she is keeping eye contact with him, these signals are friendly signals that she is probably not trying to send. 

Body Language:

Every moment, we show our feelings to others by sending out signals and micro-expressions. This is called body language. Although some body language is obvious, like a smile or a wave, real body language is subconscious and difficult for us to control. What makes it so tricky is that the signals we may be sending may be very different than what we want to send.  This is why being able to read other’s body language is so very important.  

Cartoon:

In the image above, we see a man and a woman on the subway. The woman has arrows pointing to her that say “aloof”, an the man has arrows pointing to him saying “friendly”.  If you look at their bodies, what they are doing makes a lot of sense. The woman’s legs are crossed and her arms are across the body, which shows that she is guarded and uncomfortable. But, the man has a smile and an open stance, and his core is directed towards the woman, which means he indeed is feeling friendly and comfortable towards her.  What is funny in this situation is the two very different reactions. I would guess that the man is not picking up on the woman’s signals very accurately, because he doesn’t seem to notice that she is aloof.  Or perhaps the woman doesn’t notice that some of her signals are indeed friendly. Maybe he noticed that her body is angled toward him, or that she is keeping eye contact with him, these signals are friendly signals that she is probably not trying to send. 

Stereotypes:
Stereotypes are common beliefs about a certain group that may or may not be accurate. One sociologist, Hurst, reiterates the ideas that we talked about relating to stereotypes in class. He believes that stereotypes are formed by everyone, and are often formed towards certain groups due to the lack of familiarity with that group.  If you don’t know much about that certain group, you are more likely to cluster everyone together than if you were more familiar and able to recognize more differences.
Stereotypes:
In this cartoon, there are four different stereotypes pertaining to different racial/ethnic groups.  It is playing on sports teams, and how their mascots are often overly-exaggerated, stereotypical images that are not quite accurate. 

Stereotypes:

Stereotypes are common beliefs about a certain group that may or may not be accurate. One sociologist, Hurst, reiterates the ideas that we talked about relating to stereotypes in class. He believes that stereotypes are formed by everyone, and are often formed towards certain groups due to the lack of familiarity with that group.  If you don’t know much about that certain group, you are more likely to cluster everyone together than if you were more familiar and able to recognize more differences.

Stereotypes:

In this cartoon, there are four different stereotypes pertaining to different racial/ethnic groups.  It is playing on sports teams, and how their mascots are often overly-exaggerated, stereotypical images that are not quite accurate. 

Personality;
Someone’s personality is a collection of  characteristics and traits that make them who they are. Specifically, their personality encompasses their behavior (how they act), their thoughts (what they think), and their emotions (how they feel). No two people have the same personality, although some have certain things in common with one another.  There is also two types of personalities.  First, there is how people perceive you, and then there is the part of your personality that everybody doesn’t necessarily notice but it is a part of you nonetheless. 
Cartoon:
In this cartoon there is a couple in therapy.  The woman is very sunny and happy, while her partner, Vlad, is a vampire. This cartoon accentuates the differences between their personalities and when the doctor says “I think what Vlad is trying to say is that he’s threatened by your sunny disposition…” he shows that all personalities are different, and some personalities mesh together better than others. 

Personality;

Someone’s personality is a collection of  characteristics and traits that make them who they are. Specifically, their personality encompasses their behavior (how they act), their thoughts (what they think), and their emotions (how they feel). No two people have the same personality, although some have certain things in common with one another.  There is also two types of personalities.  First, there is how people perceive you, and then there is the part of your personality that everybody doesn’t necessarily notice but it is a part of you nonetheless. 

Cartoon:

In this cartoon there is a couple in therapy.  The woman is very sunny and happy, while her partner, Vlad, is a vampire. This cartoon accentuates the differences between their personalities and when the doctor says “I think what Vlad is trying to say is that he’s threatened by your sunny disposition…” he shows that all personalities are different, and some personalities mesh together better than others. 

Multiple Personality Disorder:
In this disorder, also known as Dissasociative Identity Disorder, the patient expresses at least two (sometimes more) distinct identities that react to the person’s surroundings in their own, different ways. In addition to this, the person may have other symptoms including panic attacks, depression, and paranoia. Causes may be related to stress, trauma, or problems with nurture during childhood. 
Comic:
This cartoon is related to this disorder because the banana (which is in a therapy session) has indecisive feelings over what it likes. One peel says it wants whipped cream, the other doesn’t want whipped cream, another peel wants strawberry, while another is completely repulsed. Although these are different peels, they make up one banana as a whole. Similarly, a person with this disorder may have multiple different personalities/alter egos, but they are really one person- there lies the problem. 

Multiple Personality Disorder:

In this disorder, also known as Dissasociative Identity Disorder, the patient expresses at least two (sometimes more) distinct identities that react to the person’s surroundings in their own, different ways. In addition to this, the person may have other symptoms including panic attacks, depression, and paranoia. Causes may be related to stress, trauma, or problems with nurture during childhood. 

Comic:

This cartoon is related to this disorder because the banana (which is in a therapy session) has indecisive feelings over what it likes. One peel says it wants whipped cream, the other doesn’t want whipped cream, another peel wants strawberry, while another is completely repulsed. Although these are different peels, they make up one banana as a whole. Similarly, a person with this disorder may have multiple different personalities/alter egos, but they are really one person- there lies the problem. 

Parenting Styles
There are three main parenting styles according to Diana Baumrind- Authoritative, Authoritarian, and Permissive. Authoritarian parents are controlling and unresponsive to their children.  These parents strive for their children to understand the importance of rules, and often are very strict without explanation. Permissive parents, on the other hand, are responsive to their children, but do not have much control over them.  These parent types tend to let their child do whatever they want, and sometimes the children can feel un-loved from their parent’s lack of opinion.  Authoritative Parenting is a happy medium between the two other styles mentioned above where the parent is nurturing and responsive. 
Cartoon:
In this cartoon, Vincent’s parents are mentioned for the way they cheer him on. His parents seem like Authoritative parents because they react to him and are supportive without being overly controlling. The other children’s parents, on the other hand, are described to “go ballistic”. Perhaps they have authoritarian parents who are very strict and less nurturing. 

Parenting Styles

There are three main parenting styles according to Diana Baumrind- Authoritative, Authoritarian, and Permissive. Authoritarian parents are controlling and unresponsive to their children.  These parents strive for their children to understand the importance of rules, and often are very strict without explanation. Permissive parents, on the other hand, are responsive to their children, but do not have much control over them.  These parent types tend to let their child do whatever they want, and sometimes the children can feel un-loved from their parent’s lack of opinion.  Authoritative Parenting is a happy medium between the two other styles mentioned above where the parent is nurturing and responsive. 

Cartoon:

In this cartoon, Vincent’s parents are mentioned for the way they cheer him on. His parents seem like Authoritative parents because they react to him and are supportive without being overly controlling. The other children’s parents, on the other hand, are described to “go ballistic”. Perhaps they have authoritarian parents who are very strict and less nurturing. 

Helicopter Parents:
Helicopter parents are completely involved in their children’s life.  They are best described over-protective, and are called helicopter parents because they tend to “hover” over their child and involve themselves when they aren’t needed. I believe there are two types of helicopter parent relationships (based on what we looked at in class). In some cases the helicopter parent can be controlling, while in other instances it may be the opposite; the child has power over the parent and takes advantage of this.
Cartoon:
In this cartoon, the father peers into the bathroom and says to his wife ” you don’t think you’re just a tad overprotective?” Clearly, the father’s assumption is right; This mother is clearly a helicopter mom. Not only is she supervising her children’s bath time, but she has hired a life guard to watch over her children while they bathe as well! 

Helicopter Parents:

Helicopter parents are completely involved in their children’s life.  They are best described over-protective, and are called helicopter parents because they tend to “hover” over their child and involve themselves when they aren’t needed. I believe there are two types of helicopter parent relationships (based on what we looked at in class). In some cases the helicopter parent can be controlling, while in other instances it may be the opposite; the child has power over the parent and takes advantage of this.

Cartoon:

In this cartoon, the father peers into the bathroom and says to his wife ” you don’t think you’re just a tad overprotective?” Clearly, the father’s assumption is right; This mother is clearly a helicopter mom. Not only is she supervising her children’s bath time, but she has hired a life guard to watch over her children while they bathe as well!